Tag Archives: Privacy

NEW YORK – Last April researchers discovered the Heartbleed security bug. Dubbed “the most dangerous security flaw on the web”; it affected over 500,000 websites and dominated national news for weeks.

One year later, a new Dashlane study finds that an alarming 86% of Americans have not heard of Heartbleed.

Concerned by the growing frequency of hacks, breaches and other online security vulnerabilities, Dashlane commissioned the study (conducted on their behalf by Harris Poll in March 2015 among over 2,000 US adults ages 18+) to gauge public awareness and knowledge about online privacy, security and protection. Other notable findings include:

  • 65% – Believe the Obama administration has done LESS than corporations to protect them from hackers, breaches, and online security threats in the year following the Heartbleed bug.
  • 43% – Would rather have explicit photos/videos of themselves leaked than have hackers steal $1,000 from their bank account.
  • 32% – Chose themselves (more than anyone else) when asked which organization or person(s) they expected to do the best job protecting their interests from hackers, breaches and online security threats.
  • 1% – Chose their private email as the personal information they are most concerned with online hackers stealing, despite email being an easy front door to valuable and exploitable personal information.

Emmanuel Schalit, Dashlane CEO, states:

That almost 9 out of 10 people have never heard of the most dangerous security flaw of the past year is mind-blowing. Much work remains in educating the public about the dangers that exist online. Attacks such as Heartbleed are becoming more commonplace, and larger in scale, and it’s critical that everyone is aware and educated about the threats as they affect all of us.

Expert Video:  http://youtu.be/MEaX2tjUxQE

Full report + methodology and infographic: Dashlane.com/heartbleed

Experts Weigh In

As part of its Heartbleed Study, Dashlane assembled a team of experts from the realms of business, advocacy and academia to provide the public with an assessment of the fallout from Heartbleed, as well as analyze the online security and privacy challenges that lie ahead. Their responses were compiled into a video that can be accessed via the link above. The team included:

 

  • Nuala O’Connor – CEO & President, Center for Democracy & Technology
  • Catherine Lotrionte – Director, Georgetown University Cyber Project
  • Todd Simpson – CSO, AVG Technologies
  • Sunday Yokubaitis – President, Golden Frog

Mr. Simpson explained, ”Very few people registered Heartbleed as affecting their daily Internet lives”, a statement echoed by Professor Lotrionte who said, “The average citizen is not especially worried unless there is a tangible threat they can understand.”

Sunday Yokubaitis compared some Americans to teenagers when it comes to online security and privacy as, “They want to get on the motorcycle, go fast and completely ignore security for the sake of convenience and speed.” Nuala O’Connor, a recent participant in President Obama’s Cybersecurity Summit, stated, ”We’ve just seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of securing our digital lives, reputation and security.”

“Everyone in the digital world needs to know that they are their own first line of defense when it comes to online security”

The experts were in agreement that the biggest online security challenge is public education. All believed that a massive public education program, rivaling or exceeding that of the anti-smoking campaigns, is needed to generate the scale of awareness necessary to change behaviors.

An example of this is the public’s lack of understanding the risks associated with their email. Nearly 3 out 4 (72%) Americans in the Dashlane study said they were more afraid of hackers getting access to their Social Security Number or bank account than private email (1%). This sentiment was reflected in Dashlane’s own internal data as users changed 63 times more passwords on banking and finance websites in the month following Heartbleed than they did for email.

In fact, of the 14 websites that experienced the highest percentage of changed passwords following Heartbleed, 11 were related to banking, finance and payments. Yet, most people fail to realize that email is even more critical as it’s a gateway hackers use to steal exploitable information; a situation that was played out during the Sony hack.

The study also asked consumers who they expect to best protect them from online threats, and nearly 1/3 (32%) of Americans chose themselves. Schalit believes this self-reliance shows that some consumers have the right intuition, but believes this figure should be even higher.

“Everyone in the digital world needs to know that they are their own first line of defense when it comes to online security. There is, without a doubt, a role for governments and technology companies to play in making the online world safer for everyone, but the benefits these organizations can provide are marginal if the average citizen is not educated about the threats that exist and the actions they should take.”

Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of Dashlane from March 10-12, 2015 among 2,014 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Ryan Merchant (Ryan@Dashlane.com).

About Dashlane

Dashlane makes identity and payments simple with its password manager and secure digital wallet app. Dashlane allows its users to securely manage passwords, credit cards, IDs, and other important information via advanced encryption and local storage. Dashlane has helped over 3 million users manage and secure their digital identity, and has enabled over $2.6 billion in e-commerce transactions. The app is available on PC, Mac, Android and iOS, and has won critical acclaim by top publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Timesand USA Today. Dashlane is free to use on one device and Dashlane Premium costs $39.99/year to sync between an unlimited number of devices. Dashlane was founded by Bernard Liautaud and co-founders Alexis Fogel, Guillaume Maron and Jean Guillou. The company has offices in New York City and Paris, and has received $30 million in funding from Rho Ventures, FirstMark Capital and Bessemer Venture Partners. Learn more at Dashlane.com.

View all posts by ryan Posted in Heartbleed, Infographics, Privacy, Security | 2 Comments

In our Link Roundup we will be sharing the articles of the week that got our attention, sparked our interest, or got us thinking. Most of these articles will be about e-Commerce, Startup Life, Security, and Efficiency.

Data Security & Privacy Global Insights | Visually

RSA: Five Top Internet Security Threats in 2012 | Notebook Review

11 Tips for E-Commerce Demo Videos That Drive Conversion | ReelSeo

How Frictionless Sharing–i.e. using Facebook– Could Undermine Your Legal Right to Privacy | The Atlantic

Adult site DigitalPlayground Hacked: Credit Card Info on 40K Exposed | Threat Post

DataViz Tool Shows You Gaping Holes In Your Password Security | FastCo Design

 

 

View all posts by Stephanie Frasco Posted in Startup life | Comments Off

In our Link Roundup we will be sharing the articles of the week that got our attention, sparked our interest, or got us thinking. Most of these articles will be about e-Commerce, Startup Life, Security, and Efficiency.

40 Checkout Page Strategies to Improve Conversion Rates | KissMetrics

New ‘Flashback’ trojan swipes Mac passwords | MSNBC

33% of Smartphone Owners Password-Protect Devices: Study | MobileMarketer

Facebook Shopping Apathy? Smart Plays on F-Commerce | Forbes

The Post PC Future: Where Microsoft & Apple are driving us | InfoWorld

 

View all posts by Stephanie Frasco Posted in Startup life | Comments Off

In our Link Roundup we will be sharing the articles of the week that got our attention, sparked our interest, or got us thinking. Most of these articles will be about e-Commerce, Startup Life, Security, and Efficiency.

Password Purgatory – Are we Ever Going to Get Passwords Right? | Security Week

Dashlane Securely Manages Passwords, Form info, and Even Purchases for you | lifehacker

Dashlane is Your Personal Internet Assistant, An Alternative to Lastpass | Addictive Tips

17 Tips for Improving Website Conversion | Digital Telepathy

The Funniest Comics About Our Crappy Passwords | Gizmodo

View all posts by Stephanie Frasco Posted in Startup life | Comments Off

I’ve been working in the computer science and Internet industry for a few years now. I’ve built and witnessed the launch of many Internet applications and services. For a long time, and even after the Internet bubble popped, the software and Internet industries were the El Dorado for new entrepreneurs and business challengers. Yet, I feel like we are currently living through a new critical turn; there has been a real perceptible change in our habits and attitude toward information.

Generally speaking, this change can been seen in entertainment and services due to the arrival of the iPhone and of smartphones. Of course, you could still use a phone that is only a phone, but I feel that one day soon, anyone who uses a phone will also have Internet access and applications interacting with the web.

This process likely won’t be complete for another few years, but still the key point for this great change is that the Internet will be available in your pocket in 2 seconds without booting a conventional machine. This has already opened the way to great applications, amazingly wonderful services, and new ways of acting.

The market for smartphone applications is really growing.  The consumer need for such services is also here.  It is not an artificial new habit that talented marketers have made-up. Internet demands and use cases will be transferred from our computers to our phones, and will add up to an already old bunch of expectations from geeky daydreamers. Because Internet and physical hardware has grown, today we don’t just build small toy applications — we can also deliver great, consistent applications with powerful results for users.

At Dashlane, we are in the process of porting our application to mobile platforms. This will be GREAT.

It will be smart, powerful, and breathtaking.

We already have some wonderful ideas for it. The entire team is looking forward to using Dashlane on iPhone, iPad, and Android.

Stay tuned…

(Photo Credit: Flickr)

View all posts by Helen Posted in Startup life | 15 Comments