The Dashlane Security Roundup

Back to School Internet Security 2015

As students settle into school this fall, they will learn new things and meet new friends. They will also learn and share the latest online sites and apps, discovering a whole world of online information and activities. From Facebook to Snapchat, Dashlane examined 25 popular sites visited by kids to see how vulnerable they leave kids to online threats.

As part of our Roundup, we've also provided a guide for parents and teachers containing actionable tips to keep kids safe from many dangers that lurk online.

View and share the results in our infographic, or copy/paste to embed our infographic into your blog:



View our full guide and methodology, with expert tips for protecting and talking to your kids about online dangers.

Roundup Analysis

Roundup Background


The Dashlane Back to School Roundup examined 25 sites and apps popular with children to assess their password security and child safety practices.

The Roundup was comprised of 28 total criteria; 18 Dashlane identified as critical to password security, and 10 identified as critical to child security and privacy. Each criterion was assigned a point value, with the Password Security section totaling 50 points and the Kid-Friendly section totaling 50 points, leading to a possible overall score between 0 and 100. A score of 25 in both sections, for a total of 50 overall, is Dashlane's minimum suggested requirement for good practices.

Here are the popular websites and applications Dashlane examined:

4Chan, AOL, Apple, Ask.FM, Facebook, Gmail, Google+, Hotmail, Instagram, Netflix, Pinterest, Reddit, Skype, Snapchat, SoundCloud, Tinder, Twitter, Tumblr, Viber, Vine, Vimeo, WhatsApp, Yahoo!, Yik Yak, Youtube

Here’s how the sites ranked in order from best to worst (Max of 50 points):

Rank Company Score
#1 Apple 50
#2 Skype 48
#3 Hotmail 44
#4 Gmail/Google+ 38
#5 AOL/Tumblr/YouTube 34
#6 Snapchat/Yahoo! 32
#7 Vimeo 29
#8 Twitter 26
#9 Facebook/Tinder 24
#10 Ask.FM 19
#11 Instagram/Pinterest/Reddit 16
#12 Netflix 14
#13 SoundCloud/Vine 10
#14 4Chan/Viber/ WhatsApp/Yik Yak N/A

Password Security Still Neglected


The Password Security section assessed sites for the following:

  1. What is the minimum required password length?
  2. Is the password visible during entry?
  3. Does the website provide advice on how to create a stronger password during account creation?
  4. Are alpha-numeric passwords mandatory?
  5. Does the site require a capital letter?
  6. Does the site provide an on-screen password strength assessment during account creation?
  7. Does the site send an account creation email?
  8. Does the account creation confirmation email display your permanent password and UserID?
  9. Does the site accept 10 of the most commonly used passwords?

The password is the seatbelt of the digital world, and having a strong password is the single most important step your child can take to protect their online privacy. As such, it’s critical that popular websites implement password security policies that require their users to create secure passwords.

So, what did we discover about password requirements during our assessment?

For starters, there is still a wide disparity in password requirements. Only 12 of the sites and apps we tested scored above the 25 point threshold.*

*4 of the 25 sites we tested did not require a password to create an account. These sites were not docked points.

The disparity in scoring demonstrates that not every website or app takes password security as seriously as they should. Passwords are the first line of defense for every user of the Internet, and it is easy and inexpensive for websites to require that their users create strong passwords. This measure is critical to help protect the data and information your child may store in an account, such as their email or physical address.

While on the surface it may not seem like a big deal to have a strong password for SoundCloud, Netflix, or Instagram, the reality is that if someone is able to break into one of these accounts, they could collect information that could leave your child’s physical and digital security at risk.

Our previous Security Roundups found a correlation between users’ password strength and a website’s password requirements. In short, the tougher a site’s password requirement, the more likely a user was to create a strong and secure password.

The two most important elements of a strong password are its length and alpha-numeric complexity. Longer passwords that include letters, numbers, and symbols are more secure.

Dashlane recommends a minimum password length of 8 characters. While 11 of the sites we examined required a password of 8 characters, only Apple, Skype, and Hotmail required users to create passwords that had a mix of characters.

Although the results were not ideal for security, parents can find some comfort in the fact that numerous popular websites, including Gmail, Twitter, and Snapchat are keeping their users safe by requiring them to have strong passwords.

Here’s how the websites fared
(Max of 50 points):

Rank Company Score
#1 Netflix 30
#2 Viber/WhatsApp 20
#3 Apple/YouTube/Twitter/ Instagram/Skype/Viber 16
#4 SoundCloud/Vimeo/YouTube/ Facebook/Google+/Pinterest/ Reddit/Twitter/Skype/Yik Yak/ AOL/Gmail/Hotmail/Yahoo! 12
#5 Ask.FM 9
#6 Tinder 8

Kid-Friendly? Dangers Lurk on Most Top Websites


Our Kid-Friendly section assessed sites for the following:

  1. Does the site potentially expose the user to sexual, violent, nude, or adult content?
  2. Does the site allow participants younger than 13 to sign up unimpeded?
  3. Does the site allow posting or sending of photos, audio, or videos in any way?
  4. Does the site allow posting or sending of comments, questions, or any text-based content by users?
  5. Are user videos, images, and/or data permanently stored on the site’s servers?
  6. Does the site allow the user to make their account private to prevent it from showing up in the public domain?
  7. Does the site display the user’s location publicly?
  8. Does the site display advertising alongside content?
  9. Does the site require social login?

Dashlane selected criteria to assess a variety of common security and privacy issues that could affect younger users of popular websites and apps. Although not fully comprehensive of every threat children potentially face, the scores paint a thorough portrait of the dangerous elements younger users of these sites could face.

The Kid-Friendly section operated on a 50-point scale and only Netflix received a score higher than the Dashlane-recommend 25.

Why did so many sites perform so poorly?

Do the poor scores mean children shouldn't use any of the sites?

What are most important security and privacy factors parents should be aware of?

The answers to these questions are varying and complex, and the best approach to assessing the full results of this section is to look at the results question by question.

QUESTION 1 sought to determine whether a user could potentially be exposed to a variety of adult content. No website or app passed this question, which was not unexpected. The simple fact of the matter is that kids can be exposed to adult content on virtually every digital platform, whether in the form of a violent movie or footage on Netflix or YouTube, or explicit photos on Tumblr or Instagram.

Almost every popular website provides some type of platform for potentially objectionable content to be viewed, shared, or listened to. Parents will never be able to shield their children 100% from such content, but they certainly can understand the risks, set clear expectations, and communicate constantly with their children about online behavior and risks.

QUESTION 2 assessed whether participants younger than 13 could sign up unimpeded. While credit must be given to the majority of sites that have clearly stated age requirements and also ask for birthdays during account sign, the key word is “unimpeded”.

Dashlane testers were able to create a fake birthdays without verification on every website but Apple. This means that a child under the age of 13 must only use a fake birthday during the account creation process to gain access.

QUESTIONS 3 & 4 tested to determine if the websites allowed users to post or send text or media. Every site possessed this capability except Netflix. This criteria is important for a variety of reasons. For one, if users are allowed to post or send text or media that means your child could potentially be contacted by strangers or outside parties. This presents obvious physical and online safety risks that have been well-documented.

Further, the sharing of content affects your child’s digital footprint. A digital footprint is all of the data, media and posts a person has in the public realm. Think of it this way: if another person can view text or content your child has shared, whether it’s a message on WhatsApp, a post on Facebook, or an image on Tumblr, someone in the public can capture it and share it with anyone else. Needless to say, the long-term consequences of this are immense.

QUESTION 5 is also tied to digital footprint as it examined whether or not user data is permanently stored on sites' servers. We frequently leave websites and delete accounts and must ensure that all of our data and information is erased and no longer accessible by anyone else.

Slightly less than half of the sites did not store data permanently.

QUESTIONS 6 & 7 were about location and account privacy. The ability for strangers and other parties to identify a child’s physical location is a major security threat and displaying users’ names publicly puts them at risk, as well.

Surprisingly, most sites do have privacy settings that allow users to keep their personal account details out of the public domain and keep their location private, but most default to sharing that information.

Enabling location privacy settings is an absolute must for all users.

Along with strong passwords, keeping your child’s account and location private are the best steps to stay safe online.

QUESTION 8 looked at whether or not 3rd party advertisements were shown. While this may not seem like the gravest of potential online security threats, parents must remember that ads may expose their children to adult content they may not anticipate.

As a parent, you have no discretion over what type of ads a company will deliver, which means young users could be introduced to a host of objectionable sites. They could also be targeted by malicious bots that direct them to sites that install dangerous spyware, malware, and viruses. Of the sites examined, only Netflix, Viber, and WhatsApp did not host advertisements.

QUESTION 9 examined whether or not a social media account, Facebook or Twitter, was required to log in. This is important because giving an app or site access to your social media increases your vulnerability, particularly since a unique password is not required. Although multiple sites in our roundup provide users the option of signing in with social media the only site that REQUIRED a social media account to log in was Tinder.

The key lessons for parents and educators from our Kid-Friendly evaluation is that the majority of websites could potentially expose children to objectionable content, and nearly every popular website will allow someone of any age to sign up unimpeded.

Now, these are indeed major red flags, but they don’t necessarily mean your child is equally at risk. First and foremost, Dashlane recommends that you research potential sites to learn their functionalities and policies. Better yet, learn them alongside your child or student so that you both know the risks and safety practices to secure yourselves online.

Be realistic that you will never have full control over your child’s digital life. Even if you go the extreme route of banning your kids from all of these sites, they will eventually have the ability to access them without you knowing and, as they grow up, it is best to equip them now with the knowledge to assess websites and online situations for themselves.

We encourage parents and teachers to use Dashlane’s nine Kid-Friendly criteria as a guide for discussion. Explain the security and privacy risks associated with each website and how you expect them to behave for the sake of their own security.

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
"In addition to having parental controls and the appropriate safe surfing software in place, what’s more important is that parents become knowledgeable about the evolving technologies/social networks out there and how kids and their peers are using them. In the end, the most impactful way to make a difference in kids’ online usage, is to have the ongoing and open conversation about what they’re doing and seeing online, making sure they are minding their mobile manners and turning into responsible digital citizens."
@jeanatahnk – Top Tech Momtweet this

Here’s how the websites fared
(Max of 50 points):

Rank Company Score
#1 Apple 66
#2 Skype 64
#3 Hotmail 56
#4 Gmail/Google+ 50
#5 AOL/Tumblr/YouTube 46
#6 Netflix/Snapchat/Yahoo 44
#7 Twitter 42
#8 Vimeo 41
#9 Viber/WhatsApp 40
#10 Facebook 36
#11 Ask.FM 35
#12 4Chan/Instagram 32
#13 Pinterest/Reddit/Tinder 28
#14 Vine 26
#15 Yik Yak 24
#16 SoundCloud 22

Final Takeaways


After combining scores, only five websites received a score above the Dashlane recommended minimum of 50: Apple, Skype, Hotmail, Gmail, and Google+. These sites offer the best combination of strong password security requirements and security and privacy policies designed to keep kids safe online.

Six sites came within six points of scoring a 50. AOL, Snapchat, Tumblr, Yahoo, and YouTube all had strong password requirements, but scored below the recommended levels in the Kid-Friendly section. Netflix, on the other hand, had relatively poor password security, but was the only site to receive a passing kid-friendly score.  

What then, can parents take away from all of this data?  

Stay Safe
Digital Stranger Danger
Digital Stranger Danger

The single best piece of security advice you can provide to kids is treat digital security like real world security. Most kids are taught about "Stranger Danger" at a very early age. They learn there are certain things you never tell strangers, and that if strangers act in a suspicious way they should immediately find an adult. The digital world is no different. Below are a list of the online "NEVERS" that kids should never engage in online:

  • NEVER give out any personal information online, whether in a website profile or to someone or some organization requesting it. This includes:
    • Full name 
    • Birthday
    • Email, phone number, and/or address
    • School, club, and/or extracurricular activity information 
    • Login credentials and passwords
  • NEVER make your profile public 
  • NEVER open emails or click links from unknown senders 
  • NEVER respond to texts or other messages from unknown senders

It might be asking a lot to expect kids to remember all of these, but an easy way of explaining it is to remind them to follow this simple rule when online:

If you wouldn't do it or share it with a stranger in person, you shouldn't do it online.

We teach our children not to talk to strangers or give them any personal information because that could put them at risk. We should think about and talk about online activities in the same, consistent way.

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
"Make sure your kids know that they must have permission for anything they download or watch. Keep an eye on what your kids are doing on their devices – have them teach you or show you."
@imaginationsoup – Mom, writer, teacher, & blogger tweet this
Digital Seatbelts
Seatbelt of the digital world

For most, the password is an inconvenient element required for virtually all our accounts. We don’t make them strong unless required, because we can't remember multiple long combinations of letters, numbers, and symbols. That may be the case, but the password is the first line of defense to protecting your online life.

The password is the seatbelt of the digital world.

Just because some of the most popular digital products don't have the most secure password policies doesn’t mean your child should have weak passwords. Your child can and should have strong passwords, even if a site or app doesn’t require one.

Quite simply, a strong password will make it infinitely harder for your child's account to be compromised or misused. In this day and age, it doesn't take a world-class hacker to break into an account, especially when so much of our personal information is already available in the public domain.

So, what are the best password practices to follow? 

There are two easy steps parents and their children can take to greatly improve their overall online security:

  • ALWAYS use a different password for every online account. This helps prevent widespread damage - if one of your kids' accounts happens to get breached, the hacker simply can't reuse that password to access all of their accounts and information.
  • ALWAYS make your passwords complex. You should never use easy to crack passwords, such as names, locations, or common terms. Ideally your password should be at least 8 characters long and include a random combination numbers, letters, and symbols. The easiest way to know a password is strong is to use a random password generator.

Even those with the best of memories will struggle to memorize multiple complex passwords. That's where password managers such as Dashlane come in as they make password life much easier by generating strong passwords, securely storing them, and then automatically logging in users. A good password manager will also alert users of a breach, and enable them to change passwords instantly.

The chances of being seriously injured or killed in a car accident is relatively low. Yet, because riding in cars is something we do so frequently we've learned to tolerate the minor inconvenience of wearing a seatbelt. For most, this inconvenience is worth keeping themselves and their loved ones safe. Passwords are no different. 

Device Security
Safe from Threats

After educating your child about digital stranger dangers and good password practices, the next step you can take to keep them safe involves securing their devices, both physically and digitally.

  • ALWAYS lock devices. Kids should always use a passcode on their phones and tablets, as well as on desktop and laptops. This ensures that nobody can easily access their information should they lose their device or have it stolen.
  • Trusted Networks Whether browsing on a smartphone or a computer, your child should only connect to trusted networks. Unknown networks present a litany of security risks, the most serious being the potential for a hacker to record and steal all of the data your child sends across the network.
  • Trusted Email A favorite method for hackers seeking to steal information is "phishing". This involves sending a person an email that looks similar to an email they would receive from a company or person, but is actually fake and contains a link that, when clicked, enables the hacker to access your data. The simplest way to prevent a phishing attack is to open emails only from trusted sources. If your child is ever in doubt, they shouldn't open the email and definitely should not click any links
  • Trusted Software/Apps The only places you should download software or apps from are official sites. Similar to phishing attacks, a favorite technique of hackers and spammers alike is to lure users to non-official sites to download software. Although the software may actually work, it could still be littered with viruses, spam, keylogging software, and other malicious elements. On the same note, kids should never use pirated or cracked software as they often present the same dangers.
WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
"Tech safeguards can be really helpful, but our kids will be even safer as we focus more on helping them develop the internal safety 'tools': empathy, resilience and the three literacies of this social media environment (digital, media and social literacy)."
@annecollier – Youth-tech news blogger and youth and free speech advocatetweet this
Online Privacy
Private Profiles

If passwords are the best way to keep your child's accounts secure, then maintaining their privacy is the best way to keep them physically safe.

Keeping your child’s location private is critically important. Many popular applications will automatically provide a location whenever a user engages the app by posting or commenting. Often those posts and apps publicly include your child’s profile, data, photos, or other personal information.

Help your child set apps and devices to not show location when they use them and make sure account settings mark the account as private for those sites that allow it.

Most importantly, have conversations about the risks of location-sharing. Children are intelligent enough to use all of this technology and they are also smart enough to have discussions about being responsible online. Being able to discuss these dangers is a necessary step to teaching your children to maintain and respect their own privacy.

Digital Footprint
Lasting Consequences
Lasting consequences

You child's digital footprint begins the moment they enter the online world. Our culture encourages people to constantly share their information, thoughts, images, and video online. The danger for your child is that virtually everything they do in the digital world can be saved

Unfortunately, the most popular sites and apps for kids are often the ones that provide them the least amount of control over their online presence. A post on Twitter or Facebook can easily be screen-grabbed and shared. A private message or photo sent via text message can be resent to countless others.

The long-term implication is that your child's permanent reputation can be damaged by a single mistake. A picture meant for a friend or a private joke posted via chat can live forever in the digital realm. It's crucial your child understand that everything they post and share is out of their control. Harsh, but true

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
Top tip for teachers to share with students: “Social media is more than a venue to interact with friends and classmates. It's your future. Use it with care.”
@SueScheff – Author & nationally-recognized parent and internet security advocatetweet this
Early Education
Early Education

The sooner you can speak with your child about their digital footprint, the better. There will come a point when you will not be able to monitor or control all of their online activities. The better informed your child is about lasting impacts of their online activities, the better equipped they will be to control their online presence.

The first lesson is to teach your child is that everything they do on their computer, tablet, and smartphone will potentially live somewhere forever. Although many apps and websites do actually delete certain user data, that does not mean that a recipient or follower can't find a way to save content one may wish to delete.

Anything that can be captured and saved digitally can be made public at some point.tweet this

This can be difficult as kids and teenagers often don’t pause to consider long-term consequences and ramifications of their actions. It's critical to instill in them the best practices as early as possible.

WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY
Top tip for parents: “Make digital conversations as frequent as possible with your kids. Your child's online safety is a reflection of your offline discussions.”
@SueScheff – Author & nationally-recognized parent and internet security advocatetweet this
The Jumbotron Rule
Jumbotron

An easy way to get your child to be more aware of their digital footprint is teaching them the "Jumbotron Rule". The Jumbotron Rule is simple; unless you'd be comfortable posting the text, comment, email, photo, or video on a Jumbotron to a stadium full of people, you pause to weigh the risks of posting. Ultimately, you and your child decide what belongs online from each of you, but this serves as a good reminder to think about the power of digital posting and sharing. The Jumbotron Rule is a really simple way of planting the seed in their mind about being vigilant and cognizant of their online presence.

If you wouldn't want strangers or your parents to see your content then it doesn't belong online.

One key to using the rule, though, is that you have to use it yourself, if you expect kids to use it as their guide.

Do Not Share List
Do not share

Below are some specific items your child should know to never send, share, and/or post:

  • Intimate, nude, or sexual images and videos
  • "Sext" messages 
  • Hateful or derogatory comments, posts, or messages
  • Any items that provide information about your home or other private location

All of these items can be easily captured digitally by other parties and used against your child. Although they may feel peer pressure to engage in these activities, you can teach your child the importance of keeping a positive presence in the digital and online realms. One way to accomplish that is to not only teach your child what not to post, but also teach them what TO post. Set an example and post things together and, most importantly have fun being safe online.

Stay Safe and Keep Learning
Do not share

This internet security roundup gives parents, teachers and children some tools and scores to assess the dangers of online activities. It is a guide for keeping kids safe online and it provides some tips for teaching children about online privacy and security.

Here is our final tip as online security experts and as parents:

Just like words spoken to another person, you may never be able to take back online mistakes, but *you can move on*. If mistakes are made, make sure you and your child keep communicating and making online security an ongoing, evolving part of your lives.

You’re the real expert! Share your advice to help other parents and educators protect their children and students.

More Expert Advice

"Learn together. Parents are constantly trying to stay on top of and control online and social media use by children and adolescents. The best way to teach online safety is to rely on open and honest communication, and to learn together. Looking through a social media feed together and asking your kids to think about what might be friendly versus what might be hurtful helps your child reframe her thoughts and view photos, updates and comments through an empathic lens. Empower your kids to make safe choices by talking with them, not at them."

@katiefhurley - Author, psychotherapist, and parenting experttweet this



"There is never one fast and easy piece of advice. You need to know yourself as a parent, and your child, and be comfortable with the uncomfortableness you're going to be facing. But, you need to have a strong relationship between parent and child to know that there is an open door policy both ways. Don't be afraid to tell them the 1% of the online world - the haters, the trolls, the bullies and time-wasters - and your child needs to be able to tell you about those commenters, as well. The online space is a wonderful, educational and almost mandatory world these days, and best to keep those lines of communication open."

@ThatEricAlper – Host of SiriusXM's ThatEricAlper show and father of 12-year-old blogger and activist Hannah Alper tweet this



"Be sure to turn off the hidden location tracking in your child's phone. According the manufacturers this setting is turned on for targeted advertising but it tracks everywhere your child goes and stores their most frequent locations. On top of that the information goes back a year or more. Even with it turned off you can still use "Find My iPhone" or other family locator apps. For iPhones, go to Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services > Frequent Locations. Then slide the bar to "Off." For Androids, go to Settings > Network Connections > Location. Click "Google Location History", hit "Delete Location History" at the bottom and click "Off."

@2Wired2Tired – Two parents blogging about the best in family and tech tweet this



"Make sure your kids know that they must have permission for anything they download or watch. Keep an eye on what your kids are doing on their devices -- have them teach you or show you."
"Teach your kids how to be savvy. Here are a couple examples: 1) Teach them to look at the website's URL to see if it seems like a legitimate link to click. 2) Teach them to never give their real name or real address or real birthday."

@imaginationsoup – Mom, writer, teacher, & blogger tweet this



"1) Know the platform before your child starts using it. If you're going to allow your young person to use a particular social media platform it is imperative that you understand the interface and what anyone can do on that platform. This will allow you to name boundaries and expectations in an informed way. 2) They may be more tech-savvy than you but you are fully in charge. Monitor usage and be clear and concise about your expectations around their behavior and the people they engage with. "

@BrandonCardet - Passionate NYC Principal and social justice and child education advocatetweet this



"In addition to having parental controls and the appropriate safe surfing software in place, what’s more important is that parents become knowledgeable about the evolving technologies/social networks out there and how kids and their peers are using them. In the end, the most impactful way to make a difference in kids’ online usage, is to have the ongoing and open conversation about what they’re doing and seeing online, making sure they are minding their mobile manners and turning into responsible digital citizens."

@jeanatahnk – Top Tech Momtweet this



"Tech safeguards can be really helpful, but our kids will be even safer as we focus more on helping them develop the internal safety 'tools': empathy, resilience and the three literacies of this social media environment (digital, media and social literacy)."

@annecollier – Youth-tech news blogger and youth and free speech advocatetweet this



Top tip for parents: “Make digital conversations as frequent as possible with your kids. Your child's online safety is a reflection of your offline discussions.”
Top tip for teachers to share with students: “Social media is more than a venue to interact with friends and classmates. It's your future. Use it with care.”

@SueScheff – Author & nationally-recognized parent and internet security advocatetweet this



"We always screen apps and check for content before approving for review. Parents should screen for content, too, to make sure it's a good fit for their kids."
"Not everything belongs online, try to minimize your kids’ digital footprint, as well.”

@theimums – Four mums from around the globe dedicated to reviewing apps and technology for childrentweet this



"For children just starting on digital devices have your computer set up in a place where you can monitor them.”

@SeriousKrystyn – Blogger and mom of 4 girlstweet this



"Recognizing the importance of being *truly* involved in your children’s lives, “there’s no such thing as quality time, there is only quantity time (for and with kids)!”

@BruceSallan – Host of #DadChat on Twitter to help parents learn and support each othertweet this

Downloadable Tip Sheet

Share or Download our tip sheet to hang in your house or classroom.

Downloadable Internet Safety Tip Sheet
Roundup Results in Detail
Website Overall Score Password Security Score (Max 50) Kid-Friendly Score (Max 50)
Full Methodology

The study was conducted by Dashlane between August 3-25, 2015. Dashlane examined 25 popular websites and apps. The sites and apps were analyzed based upon a set of 28 criteria. Each criterion was a assigned a point value, giving each site or app a total possible Dashlane Security Score between 0 - 100. 4 of the 25 tested sites did not require a password to create an account. These sites were not docked points and were given N/A for the Password Security section. The score they were given in the Kid Friendly section was doubled to produce a final score adjusted to account for the 100-point scale.

Download the full results here.

Question Point Value
Account Creation Password Process
1. What is the minimum password length? 8
2. Is the password visible during entry? 2
3. Does the website provide advice on how to create a stronger password during the account creation? 4
4. Are alpha-numeric passwords mandatory? 8
5. Does the site require a capital letter? 4
6. Does the site provide an on-screen password strength assessment during account creation? 2
7. Does the site send an account creation email? 4
8. Does the account creation confirmation email display your permanent passwords AND UserID? 4
Common Passwords: Does the site accept the following as passwords:
9. password 1
10. 123456 1
11. abc123 1
12. qwerty 1
13. 111111 1
14. 12345678 1
15. monkey 1
16. letmein 1
17. dragon 1
18. baseball 1
19. Does the site send an email after a password has been changed? 1
Kid Questions
20. Does the site potentially expose the user to sexual, violent, nude, or adult content? 8
21. Does the site allow participants younger than 13 to sign up unimpeded? 8
22. Does the site allow posting or sending of photos, audio, or videos in any way by users? 8
23. Does the site allow posting or sending of comments, questions, or any text-based content by users? 6
24. Are user video, images, and/or data permanently stored on the site's servers? 4
25. Does the site allow the user to make their account private to prevent it from showing up in the public domain? 4
26. Does the site display the user's location publicly? 6
27. Does the site display advertising alongside content? 4
28. Does the site require social login? 2
Thoughts from Our CEO
Emmanuel Schalit

I'm Emmanuel Schalit, Dashlane's CEO and the proud father of a 5-year-old son. More important than my duties at Dashlane are my duties to my son who seems to keep getting bigger by the minute. As a parent, I'm concerned about the digital world he will experience at school.

You will not find someone more enthusiastic about technology than me as I believe constant innovation will improve all aspects of our lives.

However, I also know that digital innovators often focus on creating easy-to-use products before they worry about protecting their users' security and privacy.

As our kids head back to school, they will share classrooms and activities with other students who will expose them to new websites and apps. This will take place whether you have a 5-year-old, like I do, or a 15-year-old. Regardless of age, we have to remember that children are not always naturally inclined or able to understand the security and privacy issues that exist in the digital world.

What are the dangers? Do the websites and apps that our kids use protect them? What can we do as parents and educators?

These are the questions Dashlane's Security Roundup will answer.

Even the most vigilant parent cannot continually monitor their child's online activities. Whether at school, a friend’s home, or on their own mobile phone, there will come a time when your child is unsupervised online. THE most important thing you can do is to talk to your kids about online security and privacy – and keep talking to them. tweet this

And the sooner you start this conversation, the better. You'll never be able to shield your child from all of the digital dangers that exist, but your goal should be to stay informed and provide them with enough information so they know the best ways to stay safe.

Think of it as Driver's Education for the digital world. When your child learns to drive, you'll be in the car with them. But they will eventually be driving on their own. Thanks to your preparation, however, your child can be adequately equipped to handle the dangers and maximize their safety.

As the Internet dominates more and more of our lives, we as parents and teachers must provide our kids with the information they need to stay safe online.

Best,
Emmanuel Schalit, CEO, Dashlane 

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