Tag Archives: frictionless

In our Link Roundup we will be sharing the articles of the week that got our attention, sparked our interest, or got us thinking. Most of these articles will be about e-Commerce, Startup Life, Security, and Efficiency.

Data Security & Privacy Global Insights | Visually

RSA: Five Top Internet Security Threats in 2012 | Notebook Review

11 Tips for E-Commerce Demo Videos That Drive Conversion | ReelSeo

How Frictionless Sharing–i.e. using Facebook– Could Undermine Your Legal Right to Privacy | The Atlantic

Adult site DigitalPlayground Hacked: Credit Card Info on 40K Exposed | Threat Post

DataViz Tool Shows You Gaping Holes In Your Password Security | FastCo Design

 

 

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In our Link Roundup we will be sharing the articles of the week that got our attention, sparked our interest, or got us thinking. Most of these articles will be about e-Commerce, Startup Life, Security, and Efficiency.

Autobahnternet – Login and Register for sites Lightning Quick with Dashlane | Netted

Dashlane : Efficient Logins and Checkouts | Backspace Tab

Sales from Mobile Devices Double in December | Internet Retailer

How are you converting your visitors? Here are 50 articles to learn more. | Unbounce

Get Organized: Clean Up Your Passwords | PC Mag

Passwords aren’t dead, though maybe yours should be | PC Advisor

View all posts by Stephanie Frasco Posted in Startup life | 4 Comments

In our Link Roundup we will be sharing the articles of the week that got our attention, sparked our interest, or got us thinking.  Most of these articles will be about e-Commerce, Startup Life, Security, and Efficiency.   Enjoy.

What we are reading this week:

From Fixed To Frictionless Enterprise

Shopping Cart Abandonment and How to Avoid It

Startup University

Youtube Enters E-Commerce

12 Creative Design Elements Inspiring the Next Generation of UX

Facebook Rolls Out New Security Features

In a Commitment to Honesty, Twitter Finally Buries the Hatchet with Third-Party Developers

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If you haven’t noticed Facebook has been making a lot of changes lately to its site.   While these changes occur somewhat regularly, they always cause a fuss among users.  It seems as if once we start getting used to the “old” changes, new ones pop up and disturb us.  When this happens everyone updates their statuses with disdain and even hatred for the new changes. But of course that dies down until the next change occurs.

At the f8 event a few weeks ago Facebook made many large announcements.  One that stuck out to many people is something they called frictionless sharing.  Basically anything and everything you do within a third-party site and/or app will be shared with your Facebook friends via the news feed or your Timeline (formerly called Wall).

Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg says there is a lot of “friction” taking place when you have to click the “Share” button. Now all you have to do is click it once when you visit an app or site and from that moment forward anytime you revisit the app or site you are sharing it with the world. Automatically.  Fritcionlessly.

Beyond Facebook, friction seems to be a very popular topic these days.  There are many different sites and services that are attempting to reduce friction on the Internet.  And friction is something that we hope to reduce as well.  We are currently doing our best to create a good solution and we love to see other’s ideas as well.

But then again friction is a tricky subject.  For one it is subjective.  What causes friction for one, might cause ease for another.  I asked many different people in my social network what friction means to them and I got a varied array of answers.  From the new retweet button on Twitter to slow load times on certain sites, people view friction differently.

Another interesting idea to point out is the fact that sometimes trying to reduce friction can overstep the user’s will.  In fact, this is something we struggled with and debated about for many long hours with the team.

How do you make things as frictionless as possible without doing too much?  (ie. Performing actions for the user that it does not want to perform).   In the end we came up with the analogy that it is fine for someone else to prepare the contract for me, but in the end I want to be the one who is signing it.

In other words, we wanted to make a frictionless experience but we don’t want it to cause new friction. And we hope we did a good job solving these questions. Our choice for Dashlane was to help the user at all times without taking any action without his consent.

What is your idea of friction on the Internet?

View all posts by Stephanie Frasco Posted in Efficiency | 2 Comments